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Hiking in joshua Tree

Harmony motel/joshua tree newsletter 3

scott pic of harmonyThe Harmony Motel bright red sign with her striking name and brilliant theatrical musical notes, dazzles on Highway 62. It is this historical signage that attracted POP legends U2 (during their making of the groundbreaking album Joshua tree, and in more recent times a very popular pop group Snow Patrol. For many of the motel’s patrons the signage provides an artistic appreciation of the culture of the Joshua Tree Gateway Communities, which is an ambience of romantic and musical celebration of the area. Harmony is a “the combination of different musical notes played or sung at the same time to produce a pleasing sound”. The Wikipedia dictionary describes the musical harmony notes as “…. real goal of music….. all the parts of harmony have as the ultimate purpose only beautiful melody.”

Music for me is not only artistic expression of life, but it provides a healing and joyful energy to my body, soul and mind. This fall, Harmony Motel celebrates two highlighted events in the Joshua tree region, which is the 2014, 9th annual Joshua Tree Musical Festival and Highway 62 Arts Tour. Experience the sound of music under night skies, in the open sprawling desert. The perfect setting, for talented musicians, to showcase their music, to a vibrant audience, that appreciates the authenticity of the natural, intimate wilderness setting.

Over the years Harmony Motel has collected many talented patrons artwork, and used this as the aesthetic décor of the motel. Almost all of the guest rooms have original, unique paintings of local artists. These paintings are expressions of the wildlife and natural landscapes of the Joshua Tree National Park and the high desert.

Visit the Harmony Motel and check out the work of a once resident artist of the area GREGORY MICHAEL HERNANDEZ in room six and room zero.  Room six exhibits a creative mural that expresses the space, rest and work done by people in a setting that are in harmony with their environment. The expression in the mural is a genuine experience that the artist had living as a child in the desert.  Check his work out at www. http://www.exilechild.com/

As part of the motel creative décor, a corrugated wood and iron fencing encloses the pool area and certain parts of the grounds of the property.  This fencing has been artistic creation of the previous owner, a talented artist from Los Angeles that also has roots in the desert. He used recycled material taken from old depleted cabins found in the high desert. The aesthetics of the fencing captures the minimalist’s setting and lifestyle of the desert.

From Austria, the Harmony Motel features an artistic work of the talented Hans “Biwi” Lechner  in the office and common space of the motel. A recent in-depth article was published on the artist life and work click on this link http://newtopiamagazine.wordpress.com/2011/10/13/newartlab-artist-hans-biwi-lechners-global-social-projects/ to learn more about this fabulous artist that has visited the harmony every summer since 2008.

This year the 13 annual Hwy 62 open art tours will exhibit over a 132 artists from the Joshua Tree Gateway Communities.  You can click on the lick on this link www.Hwy62Art.org to read on their art tour guide and programs.

Harmony motel’s highlighted artist in this year’s annual Hwy 62 art tours is Scott Doten. Scott is an artist and Designer who comes from an artistic family, his talents were recognized at an early age: when his classmates asked him to draw peanuts characters on their notebooks. This talented artist was hired by a local real estate company to use his artwork for their listing magazine.

Scott enjoys making sculptures and furniture. His fine art combines metal, glass, and wood; sometimes incorporating found objects. This artist also makes mosaic tile, producing floor inlays depicting natural scenic subjects, as well as occasionally using tile in his furniture designs. He even enjoys painting abstract and landscape scenes on canvas. One of his metal artwork is displayed at the harmony motel together with his watercolor paintings and postcards of the motel.

Scott has been creating artwork his whole life. As a resident born in California’s high desert, he has been influenced by the wonders of the desert scape and wildlife surrounding him. Scott is open for commissioned artwork and designs, metalwork, paintings, portraits, fabrication and more. He loves the artistic freedom to be creative so that his true talents shine through.

For more information on his work, you can contact him at 760-333-5216

JoshuaTreeHarmonyMotel,Escaping to nature in California, without pitching a tent

The following article was written by a travel writer Kate Thomas, on Harmony Motel, for one of the largest travel blogs in the world, Expedia.com.

A view from Travel with Kate August 29, 2014 Winter, Road Trip, Outdoors, National Parks, Fall, California, Adventure,

Joshua Tree National Park, in southeastern California, is a dazzling natural playground for hikers, cyclists, rock climbers, and all-around outdoor enthusiasts. The park is located an hour’s drive northeast of Palm Springs. Its nearly 800,000 acres are covered with rock formations, unique shrubbery, palm trees, and, of course, those iconic Joshua trees. It all provides a commanding escape from city life. Joshua Tree is open (and accessible) year-round. But to avoid the heat, it’s best to visit between October and April. Drive in from out of town or fly into Palm Springs and rent a car. Entrance to the park is US$15 per vehicle; each entry pass covers seven days of access. It is easy to get an immersive experience in the park, whether you camp or find lodging in a nearby town.

For non-campers (like me!), it is best to stay right along Highway 62 in Twentynine Palms (yes, that’s really the name of the town). The small town has a handful of motels and restaurants, most of which are located right off the highway. Conveniently, the town also sits only minutes away from the park entrance at the Oasis Visitor Center.

On a recent trip, I stayed at Harmony Motel, a charming inn on Highway 62 with an amusing history—members of the band, U2, stayed here while working on their 1987 album, “The Joshua Tree.” The motel has spacious and clean rooms equipped with ample air conditioning and free WiFi. There is a pool and a hot tub, both of which look out on the sprawling desert and towering mountains. As soon as I checked in, I wished I was staying for more than one night.

I arrived at the motel on a Friday with an ambitious schedule for the next morning: To wake up before dawn to experience the park as the sun began to rise over the desert. In the dark the next morning, I made the short drive from the motel to the entrance into Joshua Tree National Park off Highway 62 at the Utah Trail. As I drove along the flat, winding road the sun began to spread light over the surrounding desert. I watched out the window as the terrain morphed around me. It went from a barren desert with no signs of life to a varied landscape inhabited by trees. Large boulders and rock formations appeared. And mountains rose high in the distance. In some areas I saw nothing but palm trees; in other areas, it was all Joshua Trees, all the time. I couldn’t help but get out of the car every few minutes to take pictures.

After quite a few photos, it was time to set out along a trail. There were many options, each with its own level of difficulty. Among the trails I considered were the Fortynine Palms Oasis trail, a 3-mile loop takes you up 300 feet each way in and out of the valley to a tranquil spring and cluster of palm trees; and the Ryan Mountain trail, another 3-mile hike with an incline on the way in and great views at the top. There also were a number of nature trails that didn’t appear to include much of an incline. Ultimately, I ended up choosing the Hidden Valley walk, a 1-mile nature trail loop around a beautiful area bordered by rock formations. On the ensuing hike, I saw rock climbers in action, scaling a steep rock face with professional equipment.

Without a harness and lines I was able to scramble up some boulders to get new vantage points on the valley. A sunrise drive and nature walk turned out to be an ideal way to experience the park on a summer morning; by 9:30 a.m., it was beastly hot. Despite never having camped or even spent more than a half-day in the park, I found the experience fully enriching. There’s no question I’ll be back in the fall or winter to spend more time exploring Joshua Tree on longer hikes (and maybe even for a rock climb).

For a comprehensive list of trails, walks, and activities inside the park, go to the park’s official website here. I know I’ll be looking at that page again soon.

Click on link to view article :http://viewfinder.expedia.com/palm-springs/day-trip-to-joshua-tree… Viewfinder Tip: Be sure to bring lots of water and snacks when hiking in Joshua Tree National Park. The middle of the desert can be even hotter than you expect it to be.

I Love the U2 Album “The Joshua Tree”, Do U2? Let’s Trek Across the Mojave and Find Out About Their “Harmony”

U2

Joshua Tree

July 7, 2014 by Mojave Desert USA  Leave a Comment

This article , touches on the entire bus trip that the Irish rock band U2 took before they released the album that was destined to be called “The Joshua Tree”, we will mainly focus on the portions of that trip that lie within the Mojave Desert.

Let’s start with what we know for sure, in 1987 U2 released an album called “The Joshua Tree”, before the album was released they traveled from Reno to Joshua tree with a few stops in between to take pictures.  Later they would return to film videos in Los Angeles and Las Vegas after the album was released.  The band U2 were aware of  the mythology of the Mojave Desert, this is part of the reason they used it as a backdrop to their album.  According to the designer of the album sleeve, Steve Averill, the band rented a coach in Reno, Nevada, at the time the cover was shot, The Joshua Tree album was tentatively titled “The Two Americas” with another alternate name being “The Desert”, the band wanted to capture the part of the United States where “nature and industrialization meet”.

Steve says the end photos for The Joshua Tree were the result of a “happy accident”, we had stopped and shot at a ghost town in Nevada (actually Bodie, California), and their photographer, Anton Corbijn wanted to shoot at Joshua Tree National Monument (now a National Park) next.  After the Bodie shoot they drove toward Joshua Tree National Monument, along the way they stopped at Zabriskie Point in Death Valley National Monument (also a National Park today) and shot the cover photograph, then on Highway 190 just outside Death Valley they saw a lone Joshua Tree in the distance, it was then that the band began thinking of The Joshua Tree as a possible name for the album.  They got out of the coach there and then and shot the inside sleeve photograph, all in all they were there about 20 minutes in the early morning cold weather.   This famous session with the Joshua Tree became the back cover and the inside sleeve of the album which was released on March 9, 1987.

A friend and myself decided to drive to find this elusive tree that actually fell down from natural causes in the year 2000, we found the fallen tree on July 3rd, 2014.  We assumed that it would be hot and we knew it was about a three hour drive without any big stops.  Joshua Trees only grow at higher elevations because they need below freezing winters to reproduce so we knew it would be not quite as hot as the lower reaches of the desert.  We found the spot to stop on the road near the infamous tree rather quickly, at about 4700 feet above sea level the site was quite a bit cooler than nearby Death Valley, our temperature was only about 100 degrees.  I decided to try my new 4wd vehicle and we went down some fairly sandy washes, in the end we walked about 3/4 of a mile to find this iconic monument to an Irish rock band in the middle of the Mojave Desert.  After being at the site for about 15 minutes and taking pictures we walked the 3500 feet back to the car.  I would recommend parking on the main road and walking 1300 feet to the site, its much easier than driving off road, the wash was very soft and parking on the paved road is a relatively short walk and if you are a true fan of U2 this is the way that the band traversed to the tree from their rented coach.

Back to 1987, I believe that it was later that same day that they ended up at The Harmony Motel in 29 Palms for another photo shoot and stayed in the Motel for at least a night.  While at the Motel it is rumored that they rented all of the rooms at the Harmony Motel but room #4 was rented as a group meeting place to congregate.  If you visit the Motel ask for Ash the owner, she knows alot about the U2 stay back then, she is the current owner but she has contact with the person that owned it in 1987.

On a side note, my buddy that helped me find “The Joshua Tree” fallen in the desert is recently retired from United Parcel Service.  He actually delivered packages to the Harmony Motel one of the days that they stayed there, when he made his delivery the owner at that time told him they were there in the Motel, so finding the fallen tree was kind of like coming full circle.

The Bodie, Zabriskie Point, Joshua Tree and Harmony Motel photographs were used to promote the band forevermore at concerts and on their memorabilia.

Anyone can visit these places if you know where to look:

Bodie is a state park in California, here is the link:  www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=509

Zabriskie Point is in Death Valley National Park, here is the link:  www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/furnacecreekarea.htm

The iconic Joshua Tree is on Highway 190 at coordinates:  36°19’51.00″N, 117°44’42.88″W

The Harmony Motel is in 29 Palms, it is rumored that they rented the entire motel but the gathering place where they all met was in Room #4, here is the link:  www.harmonymotel.com

On a side note another Irish band called Snow Patrol also stayed at the Harmony Motel in 2010, following in the footsteps of their Irish brethren.

On our way home we visited the ghost town of Darwin, we also stopped in Lone Pine and drove up Whitney Portal Road to get a closer look at Mount Whitney.  We then visited the Lone Pine Movie History Museum www.lonepinefilmhistorymuseum.org and learned alot about the movies that were made in this area including one of my favorites, “Tremors”.

Please be careful if you make this journey, summer is hot and winter is cold but you can always end your long day at the Harmony Motel just like U2 did.

Take It Easy – Mojave

Joshua Tree National Park/National Geograhic

An article on Joshua Tree National Park. Feature as the worlds most beautiful destinations.  Joshua  Tree National Park is the  one of  the world’s 100  unforgettable destinations.

Joshua Tree Perspectative

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Joshua tree,49 palms oasis Harmony Motel

As I briskly hike the 49 Palms Oasis trail (one mile away from the Harmony Motel) I feel the warm July breeze lightly blowing onto my skin, signaling to me the approach of the heat which bathes the high desert in a boisterous manner during our summers.  I always enjoy the end of the trailhead; it has a scenic oasis which houses its resident palm trees, “in a rocky gorge amidst an arid desert landscape. The palm trees wear their giant fan palms heavily hanging down…”

“Its distinctive leaves are shaped like a fan and folded like an accordion….. Looking much like petticoats, the fan palm’s dead leaves remain attached to its trunk until removed by fire, wind, or flood.’’ (www.nps.gov).

I notice Mr. Tortoise merrily making his way to the oasis as well, his chunky hind legs are struggling to move faster.  Every now and than I sense Mr. Tortoise getting a little anxious, that he will lose his friend Mr. Roadrunner  on the trail, especially as  hikers interrupt his pace, to take their  pictures. He desperately tries to keep up with his charming friend who is thoroughly enjoying his popularity with the travelers on the trail this still summer morning.

I almost hear a conversation between these two critters as I walk right behind them. Mr. Roadrunner, breathing very heavily, almost coughs out his words, “The meeting is at 11am…I hope that everyone will be on time…”

“I am sure they will” replied Mr. Tortoise sounding tired.  “Besides, it’s a good thing that it is at the beautiful 49 Palms Oasis, right here in our home town, and less than a mile away from our stunning Harmony Motel. I love the oasis, especially the canyons, so rocky and full of crevices; my little ones enjoy this spot and it is their favorite play place.”

“Yes, me too,” cried, Mr. Roadrunner with laughter, “I love the fan palms with the shade they provide and the height they have. I enjoy picnics with my family there, where we can play in the green, cool shade, flying up to the heights and perching on tall palm leaves where we have breathtaking views. The oasis at the 49 Palms is my kind of home, full of water or at least moisture, depending on the time of the year.  Pity I cannot stay there all year round. And sometimes during our visits we get a chance to see the bighorn sheep as they play and graze!”

“I also enjoy the 49!” exclaimed Mr. Tortoise “Because its a quiet spot, not many travelers are  aware of this part of the Park. It   provides me with so much privacy and tranquility,” he whispered to his friend.

“Yes, you are quite right, Tort, answered Mr. Roadrunner.  “Many people are not aware that the gateway to the Joshua Tree National Park is the City of Twentynine Palms. In the wilderness of the high desert, Mother Nature has provided us with a beautiful, comfortable home here.”

Mr. Roadrunner went on to say, “ Twentynine Palms is a desert oasis for our travel friends from all over the world; it provides the adventurous traveler with clear blue skies in the daytime and with dark skies at night for star gazing, unpolluted by city lights.  And then there are the scenic landscapes and clean, crisp, fresh air all year round.”

“And, our friendly human friends here are grateful and proud of our presence, as we enhance the natural desert life, as the oldest inhabitants of the Mohave preserve,” he added with distinct pride in his voice.

article written by Ash(nalini) Maharaj

Joshua Tree/Harmony Motel/Happy Thanksgiving: Part One

This post written by Ash ( Nalini) Maharaj

It’s 6.am, on this beautiful cool November morning, at the Harmony Motel, my favorite part of my day. It is my time with the desert, and I savor every moment of desert’s luxurious mornings she graciously gives me each day. I am sitting at my favorite patio of the Harmony Motel with a hot cup of coffee, eagerly awaiting the Sun to make her majestic rise.  She rises slowly and steadily this morning at dawn, spreading her beautiful rays of red and deep orange throughout the east side above the horizon, illuminating the  sky with her brilliant colors, the sun mesmerizing me as she turns into a deep golden yellow, allowing daylight to lazily peep onto the world.

 The Sun creates an enlightening, warm, bright picture of her full magnificence on the desert landscape. Her beauty is truly authentic, and she is not shy to flaunt this in front of me.  I breathe in her rays of vitality, and she energizes my entire being, making me ready to experience a day full of joyous energy. I salute her presence and significance to my life each morning.

I smell the fresh earth of the desert and I notice that the fig tree in the Harmony garden is shedding her dry leaves, the leaves slowly falling to the ground in bright colors of deep yellow, gold and browns, reminding me that the vibrant fall is fully here. The  leaves, colored in these earthy tones spread across the gardens, creating a gift wrap image, that echoes a crinkling sound as you walk on them, this natural decoration in the garden brings in the festive mood of the season, making thanks-giving a  full reality in this quite harmonious world  Fall is my joyous season in the desert. 

The desert introduces her seasons with great clarity; she had just showered us with her hot sultry summer temperatures in October, and now we are experiencing her fall’s cool and moderate temperatures. The desert in her cooler climate provides the opportunity to experience great adventures of hiking and star gazing in Joshua Tree National Park, in the wilderness of the high desert.

Joshua Tree/Harmony Motel/Happy Thanksgiving: Part Two

This post was written by Ash( Nalini) Maharaj

Suddenly my thoughts are distracted by a sound of crinkling leaves in the Gardens. My eyes dart to the Gardens, where I notice Mr. Roadrunner looking grimly at Mr. Bunny. On his right is the Harmony Lizard looking miserably cold on this November morning, while many other critters circle around Mr. Bunny straining their ears to hear his message. I almost hear Mr. Roadrunner complaining of having to attend a meeting so early in the morning.   The Harmony Lizard tells Mr. Bunny, “The cold is not good for us reptiles, so hurry up with your agenda.” To which Mr. Bunny replies “Stop being a drama queen Lizzie, it’s just one morning and it’s only the first week of fall. Sorry, dear friends, but this meeting is very urgent!” “Well”, deliberates…. Mr. Bunny, enjoying each moment of attention from his friends. “He loves these meetings, because he gets to be the centre of attention,” Lizzie thinks to herself.

 Mr. Bunny clears his throat, and continues with his message, “Now as you are all aware, Mr. Tortoise has been very depressed these past few weeks, because he lost his daughter in an accident. It was an off- highway biker, a thoughtless human that was only looking for his pleasure at the expense of our lives.  Friends, we have discussed this many times that we need to help the tortoises as they are endangered group of critters in the high desert. We need to come up with a plan on how to save the tortoise critter; we cannot afford to lose them as they are the wisest critter and one of the oldest to our world.  Their input to our survival in the desert is invaluable.”

“So I need a plan from you guys, at our next meeting at the 49 Palms Oasis. Lastly, we would not be spending Thanksgiving at the Harmony Gardens this year, as the traffic of travelers is going to be very high.”

  “Oh,” said Ms. Red Racer, her huge eyes dazzling with vanity (she loved the limelight), “they love to take my pictures, and my popularity is highest during this time.”

 Mr. Roadrunner then turns around slowly as feels the presence of his favorite friend,

 “Oh Hi,” Mr. Tortoise,” he stutters. 

 The tortoise very shyly greets his friends. He truly has an innocent demeanor and I am surprised to find him in the garden, however I notice that his familiar appearance is admired by all of his friends in the garden. My thought takes me to my recent readings on this unique looking creature.

Joshua Tree/Harmony Motel/Happy Thanksgiving: Part Three.

This post was written by Ash (Nalini) Maharaj

The desert tortoise is one of the most ancient critters of the high desert. These terrestrial animals adapt themselves very well to dry climate on land.  Their homes in the high desert are burrows that are shaped in the form of a half moon.  They keep cool/warm in these burrows to avoid the extreme cold or heat of the desert.  You would be very lucky to encounter one.

They are beautiful reptiles that are totally passive in personalities.  These humble souls have a beautiful hard decorative shell that almost seems to be artistically molded on their bodies by Mother Nature. Their long neck with their old wrinkled heads pops out of the shell, as they move slowly with their heavy rear legs (described as almost elephant- like in many critter books), reminding us of how ancient they are. To me they seem to be as old as the rock formations in the National Park.  They certainly enhance the beauty of the desert environment. They are a joy to watch.For the desert tortoise, one of their primary modes of survival is storing water in their huge bladders; this storage allows them to keep a “year’s supply of water”. The tortoise can live a full life of up to 80 years, if this species is well protected.

Their movements are very slow; hence their speed in movement is no match for bikes, cars, trucks, and off-highway vehicles. These vehicles can easily crush a tortoise shell. Always check underneath your cars before you drive off, as they often look for shady spots to rest in the desert.

 If you spot a tortoise during your adventures in the desert leave them alone.  Because if you make them anxious, they can out of fear, release their supply of water, which can be fatal to their survival, especially if they cannot replenish it quickly.  Moreover don’t use the desert as a dump site for your garbage or litter, as these creatures can get easily entangled in trash that can lead to their death. Trash attracts Ravens which are predators to the tortoise, its eggs and hatchlings.

Suddenly my thoughts are interrupted by the movements of critters in the garden, as they close their meeting by giving thanks for the tortoise life in the desert.

 For more information on the tortoise and how you can help to save them you can visit the following websites www.defenders.org and www.mojavedesertlandtrust.org  Information provided on the Tortoise was taken from pamphlets and newsletters provided by the Joshua Tree National Park Visitor Center.

And from the following texts:

1. The Desert Tortoise (answers to frequently asked questions) by James W.Cornett

2. A Field Guide to Desert Holes (revised edition) by Pinau Merlin

3. Indians and Desert Animals by James W. Cornett

CNNwriter/Joshua Tree/Harmony motel

 

The following article was written on the Joshua Tree National Park/high desert and the Harmony Motel, by Marjorie Copeland, (a CNN award Winning Writer www.cnn.com/WORLD/africa/africanawards/finalists_2008.html).

CNNarticle Our apologies- page one of the article is at the bottom and page 2 is  the opening page (it is in reversed order, scroll down to read page one first).